VINTAGE TIME REMADE IN AMERICA

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READY TO WEAR
RESTORED & OVERHAULED
ORIGINAL CONDITION
1945
COLOMBY
WWII WAR SERVICE

FROM ESTATE OF

JAMES LEROY ADAMS
TANK GUNNER 3RD ARMY
1943 THROUGH 1945


ORIGINAL
With  Movement Parts
From Ebay Investment

30 X  36
MM
W/O CROWN

WITH
17 JEWEL

INCABLOC
AS
1194
manual wind
sweep second

WITH

MODERN COPY OF THE ORIGINAL
CANVAS US MILITARY STRAP
[WAS STILL ON WATCH]

WITH

FREE
PROFESSIONAL

ONLINE APPRAISAL
WITH HISTORY AND ASSOCIATED
INFORMATION
OUTLINED BELOW
ALLOW UP TO 4 WEEKS FOR LINK


AND

FREE ONE YEAR GSW LIMITED WARRANTY

WITH

19.00 US SUBSIDIZED DOUBLE BOXED
INSURED WITH SIGNATURE DELIVERY!

26.00 INTERNATIONAL SUBSIDIZED SHIPPING
WITH SIGNATURE AND INSURANCE 

FREE USA
800 438 6894
TOLL FREE SUPPORT

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+17708311257


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11AM - 7 PM EST USA

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VISIT GSW TREASURES FOR BANDS
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IMG_5745.JPG (168533 bytes)

RARELY DOES ROCK OVERHAUL A TIME PIECE
YET LEAVE IT AS IS AND WAS
AS FAR AS COSMETICS ARE CONCERNED.

ILLUMINATED NUMERALS ARE ALMOST ALWAYS RESTORED
WHICH MEANS DIAL IN 90% OF CASES.

YET,
BECAUSE THIS WATCH HAS TIES TO THE WWII US 3RD ARMY
WITH GENERAL PATTON AT IT'S HEAD
IT BELONGED TO

JAMES LEROY ADAMS
TANK GUNNER 3RD ARMY
1943 THROUGH 1945


AS IN ONLY 1000 CASES OF 35000 PICS

ONLY A SILICONE CLEANING TO PRESERVE DIAL FINISH
A ELECTRO-CLEANING OF THE CASE
A NEW CRYSTAL
RE-ILLUMINATION OF THE HOUR/SECOND HAND
AND
THE OVERHAUL OF THE MOVEMENT
WERE ACCOMPLISHED

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U.S. ARMY ARMOR SCHOOL

U.S. Armor Center, Fort Knox
"Forge the Thunderbolt"

1918 ARTILLERY CAMP

America's involvement in World War I made it necessary to establish new military installations. In April 1918 the War Department looked to the area of West Point, Kentucky to establish a permanent artillery camp. According to the Louisville Courier, "The West Point range would become the artillery training center of the army."

On April 6, 1918 the first field artillery units arrived at West Point from Camp Zachary Taylor in Louisville. Additional units making up the Field Artillery Brigade of the 84th Division arrived the following month.

In September 1918 it was decided to permanently move the artillery camp in West Point to Stithton. The following month the Camp Knox News was founded as the post's first newspaper. That October, Camp Knox's Godman Field became the fi rst airfi eld in Kentucky when it was built for the 29th Aero Squadron.

On November 11, 1918 America celebrated the armistice that ended World War I and construction at Stithton slowed down dramatically. Later that month the first troops were transferred from West Point. Near the end of December, most of the troops there had been moved to the permanent camp at Stithton and the maximum number of troops on post reached a high of 9,000.

Troops returning from overseas were brought to Camp Knox to be discharged from the service over the next year. Much of their equipment was turned in and stored in the warehouses that still remain at Fort Knox.

The Army's force was reduced in the early 1920s and it was deemed necessary to close the post as a permanent installation in 1922. Although closed as a permanent installation, Camp Knox remained an active training center for the Army. Camp Knox was used by the 5th Corps Area for Reserve Officer training, the National Guard, and Citizen's Military Training Camps (CMTC). For a brief time, during 1925 to 1928, the area was designated as "Camp Henry Knox National Forest" until two infantry companies were assigned to the post in 1928.

MECHANIZED CAVALRY HEADQUARTERED AT CAMP KNOX IN 1931

In the following year the War Department created the mechanized force. Upon the recommendation of Lt. Col. Adna R. Chaff ee Jr. and Col. Daniel Van Voorhis, Camp Knox was chosen to be the new headquarters for the Mechanized Cavalry in 1931. The size and terrain of Camp Knox made this a suitable area for such training.

ARMORED FORCE HEADQUARTERED AT FORT KNOX FOR WW II, RESPONSIBLE FOR ARMORED FORMATIONS, DOCTRINE, TRAINING

With the outbreak of World War II in Europe, the American Army prepared with the creation of the Armored Force and headquartered it at Fort Knox in the summer of 1940. It was responsible for establishing armored formations, doctrine, and training in the use of armored vehicles. Selective Service was implemented and thousands of citizen soldiers were ordered to Fort Knox and introduced to the tank. The post was required to undergo a massive building boom and acquisition of land to support these troops.

WW II PRISONER OF WAR CAMP ESTABLISHED AT FORT KNOX

Fort Knox was site of a main POW camp between February 1944 and June 1946. The first POWs to arrive were Italian. In May 1944 they received an opportunity to volunteer for special service units to aid the American Army. While still classified as POWs, they were on an honor system and given more opportunities.

Combat operations in Korea and Vietnam presented new challenges for the branch that differed from those learned during World War Two. Thus, the Armor Center continued its role in the development and evolution of tactics and vehicles for Armor and Cavalry.

2005 BRAC ANNOUNCEMENT SETS STAGE FOR FORT KNOX TRANSITION

The most recent era of transformation began in 2005 with the recommendations of the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission. The Armor Center and School are relocating to Fort Benning to merge with the Infantry Center and form the Maneuver Center of Excellence. In addition, the Armor School is relocating to Fort Benning and, as with the Infantry School, will be subordinate to the MCoE.

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THIS UNIQUE COLOMBY WAS MORE
THAN LIKELY PURCHASED IN THE U.S.A.
1943 OR 1944

IT DEFINITIVELY HAS WHAT WAS THEN
AN ADVANCED MILITARY STYLE DIAL


CLEAR TWO TONE DIAL

OUTER OUTLINED RADIUM NUMBERS

INNER 24 HR MILITARY IN RED


BLACK STEEL RADIUM INSERT HANDS

BLACK TAIL BALANCE
SWEEP SECONDS WITH ARROW

OUTER DOUBLE
PRECISE SECONDS CHAPTER
WITH
NUMERALS

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US3ASSI.svg

The United States Third Army was perhaps the most important Armour Unit during WWII. Under the commande of  the greatest Tactical Combat General, George Smith Patton, Jr. The 3rd Army would see its only combat during the war.

The Third United States Army was first activated as a formation during the First World War on 7 November 1918, at Chaumont, France and was given the mission to move quickly and by any means into Central Germany on occupation duties.

After its success the Third Army was disbanded from 2 July 1919 to 1932 when it was reorganized during the build up to WWII,

The Third Army equipped as a armor force would have several generals at command until D Day. That was when General Bradley with Generals EISENHOWER approval, appointed Patton as 3rd Army Commander.

Lieutenant General George Patton, the greatest  U.S. Army exponent of armored warfare, took over after the Third Army was moved to France and after Bradley's formations had achieved the breakout from Normandy.

Third Army followed up on that success and began a great dash across France. It was only the inevitability of logistics problems that halted Patton's force near the borders of Germany.

It was during this time, when Third Army was re-equipped and refueled to go on the offensive again. that the Germans launched their last great offensive of the war – the Battle of the Bulge. An attempt to repeat the decisive breakthrough of 1940. Though the attempt would fail, they had nearly broke through the U.S. front and created an enormous salient .or "bulge" in the center of the u.s, lines  

In one of the greatest moves of the war, Patton turned Third Army's axis of advance through ninety degrees and set it upon the south of the German forces. The German salient was reduced by the end of January 1945, and the remainder of the process of closing up to the Rhine could be completed.

Some vicious fighting took place, but by April there was but one great natural barrier between Third Army and the heart of Germany. Unlike in 1918, the crossing of the Rhine was opposed. However, the bridgehead was won, and Third Army embarked on another great eastward dash. It reached Austria and in May liberated the Mauthausen-Gusen concentration camps complex. Its forces ended up in Czechoslovakia, the furthest east of any American unit.

Third Army captured 765,483 prisoners of war, with an additional 515,205 of the enemy already held in corps and divisional level POW cages processed between 9 May and 13 May 1945, for a total of 1,280,688 POWs, and that, additionally, Third Army forces killed 144,500 enemy soldiers and wounded 386,200, for a total of 1,811,388 in enemy losses.

Fuller's review of Third Army records differs only in the number of enemy killed and wounded, stating that between 1 August 1944 and 9 May 1945, 47,500 of the enemy were killed, 115,700 wounded, and 1,280,688 captured. Fuller's combined total of enemy losses is 1,443,888 enemy killed, wounded, or captured by the Third Army.

The Third Army suffered 16,596 killed, 96,241 wounded, and 26,809 missing in action for a total of 139,646 casualties. Between June 1941 and December 1944, Germany lost 202,000 killed fighting the Americans and British in North Africa, Italy and north-west Europe together, against 2.4 million battlefield dead on the Eastern Front

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SIGNED
COLOMBY
17 JEWELS
INCABLOC
WATER-RESISTANT

SWISS

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CASE IS CHROME PLATED WITH A FINISH
TO DEFLECT LIGHT

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LARGE ORIGINAL CROWN

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WITH LIGHT ON CASE THERE IS NO REFLECTION
THE LUGS HAVE GO-THROUGH
MAKES IT EASY TO CHANGE SPRING BAR
OR TO USE WIRES


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THIS EXACT COPY OF A WWII US MILITARY STRAP
IS AWESOME. BOTH GREEN AND KHAKI WERE AVAILABLE.
WE HAVE THE ORIGINAL US GOV ISSUE REPAIR
BOOKLET WHICH ALSO LISTED THE STRAPS

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CONDITION IS EXCELLENT
SOME WEAR CLOSE TO BOTTOM EDGES NEAR ARM AREA
NOTE COLOR DIFFERENCE

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THE ORIGINAL LOOK

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WE BELIEVED THAT AT LEAST THE HANDS GLOWING
WOULD IMPROVE THE LOOK AND USE
AND IS A MINOR ALTERATION FROM ORIGINAL

 

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LOOK IS FANTASTIC
I WOULD SAY THAT THE WEAR TO THIS WATCH WAS
NOT ACCOMPLISHED OVER DECADES
RATHER
OVER THE VERY FIRST YEARS OF IT'S LIFE
IN THE COLD AND HEAT OF IT'S
INAUGURATION

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AGAIN, CHROME FINISH IS GREAT
BRASSING IS MINIMAL
THE FINISH IS NOT SMOOTH
IT IS FACTORY ANTI GLARE

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STRAP EVEN HAS THE OVERLAY
STITCHING AROUND  EACH HOLE

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STITCHING IS PERFECT

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ANOTHER VIEW

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PERFECT

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ARMOR SCHOOL

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THIS IS COPPER WITH PLATE AND ENAMEL

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FINISH INSIDE CASE BACK IS 1ST CLASS

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HANDS AFTER ILLUMINATION

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ILLUMINATION

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DIAL BEFORE SILICONE WASH

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AS 1194

WE INVESTED ON
THE BAY IN ANOTHER
1187/1194 FOR PARTS

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BEFORE OVERHAUL
NEEDING BALANCE
MAIN AND SET BRIDGE AND LEVER

CENTER WHEEL

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OVERHAULED


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CONDITION
- EXCELLENT- 
WATCH WINDS SETS & KEEPS TIME
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WITH YOUR INVESTMENT YOU RECEIVE:

C) FREE A ONE YEAR GSW LIMITED WARRANTY

D) 699.00 PROFESSIONAL INSURANCE **APPRAISAL

**
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PLEASE WRITE OR CALL 800 438 6894 IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS!!

UNLESS STATED OTHERWISE all watches offered by GSW have been SERVICED. Some required REPAIR AND RESTORATION! Normal Servicing of Mechanical Watches by an EXPERT PROFESSIONAL will run between $180.00 to 580.00, depending on the complication of the movement and that is WITHOUT parts that may be required. SERVICING means DISASSEMBLING THE ENTIRE WATCH AND MOVEMENT, CLEANING SAME, OILING, LUBING AND REASSEMBLING, timing and Sealing. RESTORATION is a separate service from SERVICING and may include CRYSTAL, DIAL, HANDS, CASE, LUGS and BAND. So, WHEN YOU VIEW VINTAGE AND CLASSIC WATCHES OFFERED BY OTHER VENDORS/DEALERS, the question is: WAS THE WATCH SERVICED?


All watches, from mechanical to quartz devices, require periodic cleaning and inspection. GSW provides both cleaning and repair services with our main specialty that of restoring and repairing classic & vintage watches. GSW has established parts accounts with the oldest watch parts houses in the world as well as a network of watch dealers and repair centers around the world. GSW also provides dial restoration services. In addition to servicing new, vintage & classic watches, we also service high grade wristwatches. Think of your watch as you would a fine automobile, it is worth maintaining as it will increase your pleasure of ownership and also enhance the resale or trade-in value. If you plan on passing your watch on to the next generation, skilled periodic maintenance will be greatly appreciated in the future.